The effectiveness of family-based treatment for full and partial adolescent anorexia nervosa in an independent private practice setting: clinical outcomes

Mandy Goldstein, Stuart B. Murray, Scott Griffiths, Kathryn Rayner, Jessica Podkowka, Joel E. Bateman, Andrew Wallis, Christopher E. Thornton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric illness with little evidence supporting treatment in adults. Among adolescents with AN, family-based treatment (FBT) is considered first-line outpatient approach, with a growing evidence base. However, research on FBT has stemmed from specialist services in research/public health settings. This study investigated the effectiveness of FBT in a case series of adolescent AN treated in a private practice setting. Method: Thirty-four adolescents with full or partial AN, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, participated, and were assessed at pretreatment and post-treatment. Assessments included change in % expected body weight, mood, and eating pathology. Results: Significant weight gain was observed from pretreatment to post-treatment. 45.9% of the sample demonstrated full weight restoration and a further 43.2% achieved partial weight-based remission. Missing data precluded an examination of change in mood and ED psychopathology. Discussion: Effective dissemination across different service types is important to the wider availability of evidence-based treatments. These weight restoration data lend preliminary support to the implementation of FBT in real world treatment settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1023-1026
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume49
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • eating disorders
  • anorexia nervosa
  • family-based treatment
  • adolescence
  • effective treatment

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