Improving Volunteer Longevity through Internal Marketing

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Abstract

From 2010 to 2015 Australia has seen a decline in volunteer rates, despite evidence suggesting the importance of volunteers in community programs and emergency services. The purpose of this paper is to understand how motivations to volunteer and desired job design, change over time and can impact their intention to stay. Regression analysis on the data collected (n=299) from the NSW State Emergency Services (SES) was used to examine the hypotheses. The significant variables found in this study were internal social motivations and esteem and for job design, integration and flexibility. The implications for the findings suggest that organisations trying to retain long term volunteers needed to increase internal processes and create communication strategies that are inclusive
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationANZMAC 2017 Conference Proceedings
Subtitle of host publicationMarketing for Impact
EditorsLinda Robinson, Linda Brennan, Mike Reid
Pages795-798
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 6 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • volunteer longevity
  • motivations
  • job design

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  • Cite this

    Webster, E., & Small, F. (2017). Improving Volunteer Longevity through Internal Marketing. In L. Robinson, L. Brennan, & M. Reid (Eds.), ANZMAC 2017 Conference Proceedings: Marketing for Impact (pp. 795-798)