How fake drugs end up in our public health system (and how to spot them)

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticleResearch

Abstract

Prescribing and using pharmaceuticals is a matter of trust. Health service providers and patients need to know medicines are genuine. “Counterfeit” medicines that do not contain enough, or any, of the pharmacologically active ingredients are potentially harmful.

For example, you would not want to use medicines adulterated with brick dust, plaster, rat faeces or other contaminants. If you are relying on antipsychotics, antibiotics and antivirals, blood thinners or other medicines to support your health, you want them to work.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-3
Number of pages3
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
PublisherThe Conversation Paperpress
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2017

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