Petra Tschakert

Professor

  • The University of Western Australia (M257), 35 Stirling Highway, Room 1.29b, Geology and Geography Building, Perth campus

    6009 Perth

    Australia

  • Source: Scopus
  • Calculated based on no. of publications stored in Pure and citations from Scopus
20162021

Research activity per year

If you made any changes in Pure these will be visible here soon.

Personal profile

New and Noteworthy

PhD students:

- Karen Paiva Henrique: Contested grounds: Examining the contours of flood adaptation along São Paulo’s Tietê River (completed 2020)

- Basil Amuzu-Sefordzi: Renewable energy adoption in sub-Saharan Africa: A case study from Ghana (completed 2020)

- Thanh Hoang Trung: Wetland management: Understanding and Responding to Multiple Environmental Stressors in the Tam Giang Coastal Lagoon, Vietnam

- Mark Crosweller: The ethical premise of leading people through the adversity and losses of disasters

- Thi Hong Van Le: The politics of transformation for sustainable future adaptation: A case study in the Mekong and Red River delta regions in Vietnam

- Alicea Garcia: Identity, Subjectivity, and Power: How gendered determinants of social inequality affect smallholders' capacities to adapt to climate change in Ghana's Central Region

- Muhammad Rafay Muzamil: The politics of climate change adaptation in the context of conflict: Implications for rural livelihoods in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan

- Elise Haddleton: Community resourcefulness as a response to climate-related loss: Designing political visions for more just trajectories

Funding overview

• Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) and UWA Research Collaboration Award (RCA): (Re)negotiating power to enhance resilience to climate change, Tschakert CI (Paiva Henrique, Garcia, Godden, Rola-Rubzen, Parsons, Ziervogel, Asiama, Gurung, Sagoe, Browne-Klutse, Steen, Gonda, Lonsdale, Sallu, Atkins, Aarts, Martens, Machado, Carr), 2020-2021, AUD 29,870 and £ 9,000

• Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): Climate-Induced Migration: Global Scope, Regional Impacts and National Policy Frameworks, Tschakert Co-CI (Neef CI), 2020-2021, £ 10,000

• Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Project: Locating loss from climate change in everyday places, Tschakert CI (Lawrence, Bourgault, Horwitz, Plummer, Ellis), 2018-2021, AUD353,000

• Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): Non-market valuation of loss and damage under climate change, Tschakert PI (Barnett, Tuana, Pannell, Alston, Woodward, New, Ziervogel, Abu, Sallu, Prout, Bessette, Pandit, Kragt, Godden Co-PIs), 2016, £10,000
• UWA, Research Collaboration Award: Non-market valuation of loss and damage under climate change, Tschakert PI, 2016, AUD17,000
• National Science Foundation (NSF-CNH): Climatic Extremes, Mining, and Mycobacterium Ulcerans: A Coupled Systems Approach (reBUild), Tschakert PI (Amankwah, Smithwick, Oppong, Singha, Parker, and Ward Co-PIs), a collaboration between the Pennsylvania State University, the University of Mines and Technology, the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, the University of Ghana, the Ghana Health Directorate (all in Ghana), the University of Northern Texas, the Colorado School of Mines, and the University of Iowa, 2009-2015. US$1,421,997.
• Pennsylvania State University, Social Science Research Institute: Building a Research Infrastructure on Human and Environmental Health in the West African Gold Mining Sector, Tschakert (PI), 2007-2008. US$17,395
• Pennsylvania State University, Africa Research Center: Contaminated Identities: Impacts of Arsenic & Mercury Exposure among Small-Scale Miners in Ghana, Tschakert (PI) (K. Singha Co-PI), 2006-2007. US$9,980
• Pennsylvania State University, EMS Wilson Research Initiation Grant: The Rocky Path to Sustainability: Livelihood Risks and Opportunities among Small-Scale Gold Miners in Ghana, Tschakert (PI), 2006-2007. US$9,864
• National Science Foundation (Office of International Science and Engineering), US-Ghana Workshop on Resilience in the Small-Scale Mining Sector of Ghana, Tschakert (PI), 2007-2009. US$59,609.
• National Institutes of Health: Global Health and Georesource Management in Africa, Airhihenbuwa (PI), 2006-2009. US$192,375.
• International Social Science Council (ISSC): TCHANGE – Addressing the Climate Crisis through Value Transformation, Tschakert PI, in collaboration with partners in South Africa, India, UK, Norway, and the US, 2014-2015. €29,980
• International Social Science Council (ISSC): KNET - Knowledge Network for Enabling Transformation, Fazey PI, 2014-2015. €29,887.
• Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Norway: Himalayan Climate Change Adaptation Programme (HICAP), Agrawal project manager, 2011-2016. US$12,000,000.
• National Science Foundation (NSF-DRU): Anticipatory Learning for Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience (ALCCAR), Tschakert PI (Tamminga, Prins, Crane, Liwenga, Modoc, Asiedu, Keju, Shaffer Co-PIs), in collaboration with the University of Ghana, the University of Dar-es-Salaam, The Afram Plains Development Organization (APDO), and the Red Cross/Red Crescent Tanzania, 2009-2013. US$749,478.
• Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): Limits to Adaptation, Tschakert PI (Ziervogel, Alston, Wittenbury, Tuana, Shackleton, Mugera, Crane CO-PIs), in collaboration with the University of Cape Town, Rhodes University, University of Western Australia, and Monash University, 2011-2012. US$53,750.
• USAID: Climate Change Collective Learning and Observatory Network Ghana (CCLONG), Tschakert PI (Codjoe, Adiku, Abekoe, Sagoe Co-PIs), in collaboration with the University of Ghana, 2006-2010. US$759,928.
• Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): Gender and Climate Change, Tuana and Sachs PI, 2010-2012. £ 20,000.
• AESEDA/Pennsylvania State University: Climate and Society in Senegal, Fuentes PI, in collaboration with the University of Cheikh Anta Diop, 2011-2013. US$77,500.
• Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment: “A Stronger, More Resilient New York”: Responding to Sandy in the Rockaways, Tschakert (PI), 2014-2015. US$21,446.
• Penn State Sustainability Institute: Climate Change and Conflict Management, Fowler (PI), 2014-2015. US$49,500.
• Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): Resilient pasts and sustainable futures? Designing socially significant scenarios, R. Marchant (PI), 2012-2013. £ 20,000.
• Research Council of Norway: Transformative change: Integrating responsibilities, solidarity, and care into dominant climate science, policy and public discourse - Agenda setting workshop. A. St. Clair (PI), 2012. US$32,200.
• Advancing Capacity to Support Climate Change Adaptation (ACCCA), UNITAR: Food Security and Adaptation to Climate Change in the Afram Plains of Ghana, Codjoe (PI), 2007-2008. US$69,724.
• Pennsylvania State University, George H. Deike, Jr. Research Grant: Solastalgia: Environmentally-Induced Distress and Illness due to Climatic Changes among Africa's Poor, Tschakert PI (Tutu Co-PI), 2008-2010. US$49,967.
• US Agency for International Development (USAID), through USGS/USDI: Spatially Explicit Modeling of Soil Organic Carbon (SEMSOC) in Ghana, Mali, Niger & Burkina Faso, Tschakert (PI), 2004-2006. US$250,000
• Canada-Panama Fund, Canadian Embassy in Panama, and Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA): Proyecto de carbono para atraer y manejar inversiones en forma de bonos verdes, Potvin (PI), 2003-2005. US$72,710
• US Agency for International Development (USAID): Sequestration of Carbon in Soil Organic Matter (SOCSOM) in Senegal, Tieszen (PI), 200-2003. US$315,000

Languages

English
German
French; some Spanish

Biography

My research activities and practice focus broadly on human-environment interactions and more specifically on rural livelihoods, environmental and climate change, adaptation, resilience, marginalisation, loss, climate justice, social learning, and deliberate societal transformation. My academic training is in Geography, Applied Anthropology, and Arid Lands Resources Sciences. My main interest lies in the theoretical and empirical intersections of critical human geography, political ecology, environmental/social/multispecies justice, complex systems science, and participatory research. It is the result of a long-term commitment to interdisciplinary scholarship and extended periods of field work and capacity building, particularly in West Africa. I seek to understand the strategies citizens and small-scale resource users in rural and urban contexts employ in adapting to environmental stresses, coping with socio-economic, political, and institutional exclusion, and dealing with intangible losses. I draw on participatory research (PR) as an epistemological framework that promotes critical engagement with marginalized communities (of space and practice). I have found that participatory mapping, diagramming, environmental theatre, and participatory video are wonderful albeit not uncontested tools to open up alternative routes for 'doing' geography. My ultimate goal is to expand people’s opportunities for enhancing livelihood resilience.

Dr. Tschakert is Centenary Professor in Rural Development in the Department of Geography and Planning, School of Social Sciences.

Professor Tschakert was Coordinating Lead Author (CLA) of Chapter 5 "Sustainable Development, Poverty Eradication and Reducing Inequalities" of the Special Report on 1.5C Global Warming of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Previously, she was CLA on the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), on Chapter 13 (“Livelihoods and Poverty”) of the Working Group II Report on Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, and was part of the Core Writing Team of the AR5 Synthesis Report.

PhD, 2003, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA: Arid Lands Resource Sciences, with minor in Applied Anthropology
MagPhil, 1991, Karl Franzens Universitaet, Graz, Austria: Geography & Economics, French

Previous positions

Pennsylvania State University, Department of Geography and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (2005-2015)

Roles and responsibilities

Teaching:
GEOG1104 Disasters!
GEOG5002 Development Practice
GEOG5004 Place-based and Participatory Development
ENVT5518 The Sustainable Development Goals (together with Natasha Pauli)

Research interests

Research areas: human-environment interactions, climate change adaptation, climate justice, inequalities, differential vulnerabilities, dynamic livelihoods, development, participatory methodologies


Research projects: climate change adaptation, adaptive capacity, anticipatory learning, and community resilience; power and negotiated resilience; environmental, climate, and multispecies justice; non-market/intangible loss and damage; marginalization; deliberate societal transformation; climate-induced migration and mobility justice; terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change mitigation; artisanal and small-scale mining

** Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): (Re)negotiating power to enhance resilience to climate change. Tschakert (CI) (Paiva Henrique, Garcia, Godden, Rola-Rubzen, Parsons, Ziervogel, Asiama, Gurung, Sagoe, Browne-Klutse, Steen, Gonda, Lonsdale, Sallu, Atkins, Aarts, Martens, Machado, Carr). Climate change is now recognised as a global emergency. All societies will have to take urgent action to adapt and build resilience if they want to avoid unprecedented loss of lives and livelihoods. We adopt the concept of ‘negotiated resilience’ to examine resilience as a complex process that requires negotiation between different people with diverse needs, interests, and aspirations. Our research advances critical and engaged scholarship at the intersections of gender, class, race, ethnicity, and climate change. We design and test an innovative and inclusive methodological approach to practice negotiating and renegotiating resilience in rural and urban settings. Drawing upon experiences from Ghana, Nepal, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, South Africa, Cuba, Brazil, Australia, the UK, Indonesia, Thailand, New Zealand, and Oceania, we are acutely aware of the uneven power dynamics at work within and across these various contexts. At the same time, we are ideally positioned to prefigure the next scholarly wave on resilience building, and to contribute to fair societal transformation.

** Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): Climate-Induced Migration: Global Scope, Regional Impacts and National Policy Frameworks. Tschakert (Co-CI; Neef CI). This consortium contributes to a better understanding of when, where, how and at what scale climate-induced migration takes place in different world regions. It does so through a structured analysis of existing studies on this phenomenon, a systematic stock-taking of available research expertise, and a global analysis of policy and legal frameworks pertaining to climate-induced migration. The findings are expected to help inform policy measures in the field of international and internal migration and improve legal frameworks at the national and international level for the protection of so-called climate migrants.

** Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Programme: Locating loss from climate change in everyday places. Tschakert PI (Lawrence, Bourgault, Horwitz, Plummer, Henrique). This project aims to advance theory and evidence about social losses arising from climate change and other stressors. It tries to achieve this by examining what people in Western Australia value and how fire, drought and flooding put these values at risk (participating communities: Attadale, Willagee, Darlington, Kelmscott, Toodyay, Northam, Merredin, and Southern Cross). Its innovative approach reveals how community members in rural and urban places make value trade-offs and decisions over desirable futures. The project’s expected outcome is enhanced capacity to locate acceptable and intolerable losses and manage grief and hope in familiar places. New knowledge from this science of loss offers two significant benefits, namely a critical analysis of community resilience in the face of socio-economic and environmental threats, and inclusive planning for place-based adaptation.

** Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): Non-market valuation of loss and damage under climate change. Tschakert PI (Barnett, Tuana, Pannell, Alston, Woodward, New, Ziervogel, Abu, Sallu, Prout, Bessette, Pandit, Kragt, Godden Co-PIs). Loss and damage (L&D) is generally defined as the residual cost to of climate change to societies, after mitigation and adaptation. Some aspects of LD can be given an economic value (e.g. damage to infrastructure), but other aspects are difficult or impossible to value economically (e.g. identity and place), and are termed non-economic or non-market loss and damage (NMLD). We explore possible frameworks to NMLD “valuation” that are consistent with recent thinking about limits to adaptation, tolerable and intolerable losses. Drawing on case studies of climate change impacts from across the developed and developing world, we re-interrogate previous literature to define a typology of NMLD through the lens of what people value, and the potential for loss. We use case studies that represent different livelihoods and climatic stressors, for instance from the Western Australian Wheat Belt, New Orleans, Niue Island in the South Pacific, dryland farming systems in Northern Ghana, and indigenous populations in the United States and Australia.

** Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Norway: Himalayan Climate Change Adaptation Programme (HICAP). The HICAP project is an interdisciplinary, applied, and policy-relevant research collaboration between CICERO, GRID-Arendal, and ICIMOD to enhance adaptive capacities and resilience among marginalized mountain populations in the Hindu Kush - Himalayas. It is structured around seven key components: climate change scenarios, water availability and demand scenarios, ecosystem services, food security, vulnerability, women and gender in adaptation, and communication and outreach. Tschakert explores gendered adaptive capacities in Nepal (with S. Bisht and D. Gurung) and flexible flood management in Assam/India (with P. Das and N. Pradhan).
** National Science Foundation (NSF-DRU): Anticipatory Learning for Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience (ALCCAR), Tschakert PI (Tamminga, Prins, Crane, Liwenga, Modoc, Asiedu, Keju, Shaffer Co-PIs). At the core of the ALCCAR project in Ghana and Tanzania was a resilience-enhancing approach that emphasizes an iterative way of analyzing and learning about changes and uncertainties in the past, present, and future. By focusing explicitly on learning processes and decision-support tools, the aim of the project was to reverse the deterministic notion of presumably vulnerable groups as passive victims of climate change by highlighting people's skills, anticipatory capacity, and agency for adaptation planning rather than learning by shock. The project used a series of learning activities such as walking journeys, participatory scenario building, layered mapping, and environmental theatre to enhance adaptive capacity and flexible planning under uncertainty. See the ALCCAR flyer here.
** Worldwide Universities Network (WUN): Limits to Adaptation, Tschakert PI (Ziervogel, Alston, Wittenbury, Tuana, Shackleton, Mugera, Crane CO-PIs). The Limits to Adaptation project catalyzed interdisciplinary research on barriers and limits to climate change adaptation. We looked specifically at the agro-economic, institutional, and justice factors that prevent successful adaptation, both in the short- and the long-term, and identified critical thresholds as to when adaptation may be neither feasible nor desirable but requiring the transformation of entire eco-regions and/or livelihoods. Such transformations imply difficult ethical decisions that are currently avoided in the adaptation community.
** USAID: Climate Change Collective Learning and Observatory Network Ghana (CCLONG), Tschakert PI (Codjoe, Adiku, Abekoe, Sagoe Co-PIs). Research under CCLONG focused on enhancing adaptive capacity to climate change in rural communities in Ghana by building a sound information exchange infrastructure that brings the science of climate change and the implications for people and the environment to a level that is understandable, accessible, and beneficial to multiple parties. The main objectives were to understand local perceptions and experiences of climatic changes and extremes, examine determinants of adaptive capacity, and identify a variety of adaptation options for anticipated climate futures. The study followed a social/collective learning approach where project participants engage in learning activities and experiments that, ultimately, may enhance livelihood resilience to climatic and other stressors. Watch the CCLONG project video here. See the flyers for CCLONG.
** National Science Foundation (NSF-CNH): Climatic Extremes, Mining, and Mycobacterium Ulcerans: A Coupled Systems Approach (reBUild), Tschakert PI (Amankwah, Smithwick, Oppong, Singha, Parker, and Ward Co-PIs). The reBUild project focuses on an ostracizing discourse that connects small-scale gold mining to the transmission of Buruli ulcer, a debilitating skin disease, in Ghana. Our team uses a coupled social-ecological systems approach to identify linkages and non-linear dynamics between land disturbance through mining and logging, flooding events that result in stagnant water, and human behavior in potential risk areas to unravel the so far unknown transmission of this tropical disease. The project also entails a sister school component that links the Penns Valley School District in Central Pennsylvania with elementary and high schools in the partner communities in Ghana to explore linkages between environmental change and disease. For details, see the project flyer and our project website project website.
** Penn State University, Wilson and ARC Research Grants: In Ghana, more than half a million men and women are employed in the artisanal mining sector. Applying a political ecology and environmental justice lens, I examined the links between the contested use of mercury – the only extraction method available to artisanal gold miners – and their marginalization through large-scale corporations and public, academic, and state discourses. I used a participatory research design to expose how these persistent discourses that portray artisanal miners as contaminating criminals preclude them for being environmental stewards. Recognizing the miners as knowledgeable peers allowed me to create parity-fostering spaces for engagement and construct counter-narratives for livelihood resilience in this sector.
** International Social Science Council (ISSC): TCHANGE – Addressing the Climate Crisis through Value Transformation, Tschakert PI, in collaboration with partners in South Africa, India, UK, Norway. TCHANGE examined the drivers behind deliberate societal transformation in the context of climate change. Our team aimed to understand under what conditions people break out of their entrenched values and behaviors and act responsibly in an inter-connected world because they feel connected to human and non-human others. We asked: (1) What sets of values, attitudes, and belief systems with respect to climate change drive people do act responsibly, both individually and collectively? Does this responsibility include only close others or also distant others (somewhere else on the planet, future generations)? Does it also include non-human actors (nature)? How does it translate into ethical and deliberate place making? (2) What educational practices support transformative processes? What models of stewardship to exist? What commitment is there to sustainability? How can these experiences inform formal education approaches?
** Pennsylvania State University, George H. Deike, Jr. Research Grant: Solastalgia: Environmentally-Induced Distress and Illness due to Climatic Changes among Africa's Poor, Tschakert PI (Tutu Co-PI). We explored the psychological and emotional distress triggered by slow-onset, creeping environmental changes. Unlike other health-related impacts of climatic changes (e.g. vector-borne diseases), the role of sadness, depression, and desperation caused by significantly altered environments had been largely ignored. We were interested in the intersection of environmental deterioration, internal migration, and livelihood transformation. In a case study in Ghana, men and women who have moved from the northern regions to slums and shanty towns in Accra, the capital, were interviewed with respect to their motives, expectation, and experiences. Research focused on environmentally-induced illness and potential loss of belonging - termed 'solastalgia' - of those who stay behind in increasingly 'pathological homes.' This work contributed to the debate on environmental refugees.
** My doctoral research on soil carbon sequestration in the Old Peanut Basin, a semi-arid region in west-central Senegal, involved smallholders in subsistence, rain-fed farming systems. I investigated land use and soil fertility management practices, local knowledge bases, and the impact of historical and current policies on changes in land use and management strategies. I took soil and biomass carbon measurements, used CENTURY to model carbon stocks, and evaluated 'best' carbon management options.
** As a post-doctoral fellow at McGill University, I worked on community-based carbon offset projects with indigenous (Emberá) smallholders at the tropical forest margin in Panama. This included the conceptualization of an entire landscape approach to carbon sequestration and strong institutional capacity building through collective learning. In a follow-up to my post-doc work, I was involved in assessing risks, barriers, disadvantages for implementing REDD projects (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries) in indigenous communities from a rights-based angle, also in Panama.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics where Petra Tschakert is active. These topic labels come from the works of this person. Together they form a unique fingerprint.
  • 6 Similar Profiles

Network

Recent external collaboration on country level. Dive into details by clicking on the dots or
  • Emancipatory spaces: Opportunities for (re)negotiating gendered subjectivities and enhancing adaptive capacities

    Garcia, A., Tschakert, P., Karikari, N. A., Mariwah, S. & Bosompem, M., 20 Jan 2021, (E-pub ahead of print) In: Geoforum.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

  • Transforming knowledge systems for life on Earth: Visions of future systems and how to get there

    Fazey, I., Schäpke, N., Caniglia, G., Hodgson, A., Kendrick, I., Lyon, C., Page, G., Patterson, J., Riedy, C., Strasser, T., Verveen, S., Adams, D., Goldstein, B., Klaes, M., Leicester, G., Linyard, A., McCurdy, A., Ryan, P., Sharpe, B., Silvestri, G. & 163 others, Abdurrahim, A. Y., Abson, D., Adetunji, O. S., Aldunce, P., Alvarez-Pereira, C., Amparo, J. M., Amundsen, H., Anderson, L., Andersson, L., Asquith, M., Augenstein, K., Barrie, J., Bent, D., Bentz, J., Bergsten, A., Berzonsky, C., Bina, O., Blackstock, K., Boehnert, J., Bradbury, H., Brand, C., Böhme (born Sangmeister), J., Bøjer, M. M., Carmen, E., Charli-Joseph, L., Choudhury, S., Chunhachoti-ananta, S., Cockburn, J., Colvin, J., Connon, I. L. C., Cornforth, R., Cox, R. S., Cradock-Henry, N., Cramer, L., Cremaschi, A., Dannevig, H., Day, C. T., de Lima Hutchison, C., de Vrieze, A., Desai, V., Dolley, J., Duckett, D., Durrant, R. A., Egermann, M., Elsner (Adams), E., Fremantle, C., Fullwood-Thomas, J., Galafassi, D., Gobby, J., Golland, A., González-Padrón, S. K., Gram-Hanssen, I., Grandin, J., Grenni, S., Lauren Gunnell, J., Gusmao, F., Hamann, M., Harding, B., Harper, G., Hesselgren, M., Hestad, D., Heykoop, C. A., Holmén, J., Holstead, K., Hoolohan, C., Horcea-Milcu, A. I., Horlings, L. G., Howden, S. M., Howell, R. A., Huque, S. I., Inturias Canedo, M. L., Iro, C. Y., Ives, C. D., John, B., Joshi, R., Juarez-Bourke, S., Juma, D. W., Karlsen, B. C., Kliem, L., Kläy, A., Kuenkel, P., Kunze, I., Lam, D. P. M., Lang, D. J., Larkin, A., Light, A., Luederitz, C., Luthe, T., Maguire, C., Mahecha-Groot, A. M., Malcolm, J., Marshall, F., Maru, Y., McLachlan, C., Mmbando, P., Mohapatra, S., Moore, M. L., Moriggi, A., Morley-Fletcher, M., Moser, S., Mueller, K. M., Mukute, M., Mühlemeier, S., Naess, L. O., Nieto-Romero, M., Novo, P., ÓBrien, K., O'Connell, D. A., O'Donnell, K., Olsson, P., Pearson, K. R., Pereira, L., Petridis, P., Peukert, D., Phear, N., Pisters, S. R., Polsky, M., Pound, D., Preiser, R., Rahman, M. S., Reed, M. S., Revell, P., Rodriguez, I., Rogers, B. C., Rohr, J., Nordbø Rosenberg, M., Ross, H., Russell, S., Ryan, M., Saha, P., Schleicher, K., Schneider, F., Scoville-Simonds, M., Searle, B., Sebhatu, S. P., Sesana, E., Silverman, H., Singh, C., Sterling, E., Stewart, S. J., Tàbara, J. D., Taylor, D., Thornton, P., Tribaldos, T. M., Tschakert, P., Uribe-Calvo, N., Waddell, S., Waddock, S., van der Merwe, L., van Mierlo, B., van Zwanenberg, P., Velarde, S. J., Washbourne, C. L., Waylen, K., Weiser, A., Wight, I., Williams, S., Woods, M., Wolstenholme, R., Wright, N., Wunder, S., Wyllie, A. & Young, H. R., Dec 2020, In: Energy Research and Social Science. 70, 101724.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Open Access
If you made any changes in Pure these will be visible here soon.